Sydney to San Francisco

Asia-Americas

Itinerary

  • Day 1 - Sydney, Australia As your ship passes Harbour Heads, you are presented with the shimmering skyline of Sydney - hailed by many seafarers as "the most beautiful harbor in the world." Two prominent landmarks, Harbour Bridge and the sail-like curves of the Sydney Opera House, grace the backdrop of this picturesque harbor. There is a wealth of adventure waiting in Sydney - from its cosmopolitan city center to miles of beautiful beaches and the Blue Mountains. Australia's oldest and largest city was born in 1788 with the arrival of the "First Fleet" transporting 760 British convicts. Today, Sydney is the largest port in the South Pacific and is often voted the most popular destination in the South Pacific.
  • Day 2 - At Sea
  • Day 3 - Brisbane Once considered the "country cousin" among Australian cities, Brisbane is today the nation's third-largest metropolis - and one of the most desirable places to live in the country. Lying on the banks of the meandering Brisbane River, this cosmopolitan city boasts elegant 19th-century sandstone buildings, a lively cultural scene and superb parklands. Brisbane is also your gateway to uniquely Australian adventures, be it the theme parks of the Gold Coast or Queensland's dazzling beaches.
  • Day 4 - At Sea
  • Day 5 - At Sea
  • Day 6 - Alotau, Papua New Guinea
  • Day 7 - At Sea
  • Day 8 - At Sea
  • Day 9 - At Sea
  • Day 10 - At Sea
  • Day 11 - At Sea
  • Day 12 - Manila
  • Day 13 - At Sea
  • Day 14 - At Sea
  • Day 15 - At Sea
  • Day 16 - Incheon In 1394, royal geomancers chose the site of present-day Seoul as the new capital of the Chosen Dynasty. Today the capital of Korea is home to over ten million inhabitants, a quarter of the country's population. The city is one of the great showcases of Asia, a center for trade, commerce - and tourism. Despite Seoul's hyper-modernism, the city offers an intriguing counterpoint between past and present. Bustling traffic speeds by quiet palace gardens while modern skyscrapers tower over century-old shrines. The port of Incheon is your gateway to Seoul and South Korea. Westerners first entered Korea from the port in the 1880s. Incheon was also the site of General Douglas Macarthur's surprise amphibious landing during the Korean War.
  • Day 17 - At Sea
  • Day 18 - Busan The second largest city in South Korea, Busan is your gateway to a fascinating land whose culture is a unique amalgam of old and new. Modern high-rise towers dwarf ancient Buddhist temples. The city's bustling business district offers a stark contrast to the serene grounds of Yongdusan Park. In short, Busan is a microcosm of South Korea, a nation whose startling economic success often obscures one of Asia's most sophisticated and venerable cultures. Busan was the scene of bitter fighting during the Korean War. The United Nations Memorial Cemetery marks the final resting place for the troops from 16 nations who gave their lives during the conflict.
  • Day 19 - Jeju Jeju-do lying off the south coast of Korea is the warmest and wettest place in the entire country. The island is at its most beautiful in spring when the azalea blooms in a riot of delicate colours and the wooded areas display the most fascinating shades of green. In Jeju the seasons determine the changing hues of color through the island. In the autumn the color that dominates is brown and orange due to the falling leaves, in summer the aqua blue waters of the sea and golden beaches take over as in spring the brilliant yellow flowers cover the landscape. Jeju Island, also known as the "Island of the Gods," is a popular vacation spot for Koreans and many Japanese. It remains one of the top honeymoon destinations for Korean newlyweds. The island's mixture of volcanic rock, frequent rains, and temperate climate, make it very similar to the Hawaiian Islands in the U.S. The island offers visitors a wide range of activities: hiking on Halla-san (South Korea's highest peak), catching sunrises and sunsets over the ocean, viewing majestic waterfalls, riding horses, or just lying around on the sandy beaches.
  • Day 20 - At Sea
  • Day 21 - Osaka For centuries, Osaka was Japan's cultural and commercial gateway to Asia - the point of entry both for trade goods and, most importantly, cultural influences that shaped Japanese society. From tea to Zen, from art to science and philosophy, Osaka was Japan's contact with the great East Asian cultures that flourished in China and Korea. The city reached its zenith in the late 16th century, when the great feudal lord Toyotomi Hideyoshi made Osaka his capital. Toyotomi was master of Japan, and an immense administrative and commercial center rapidly developed around Osaka Castle. After Toyotomi's death, the nation's seat of power shifted from Osaka to a sleepy little fishing village called Edo - modern Tokyo. While overshadowed by Tokyo, Osaka remains Japan's second largest city and a vital commercial center. Modern Osaka is home to monuments from Japan's past including Toyotomi's immense castle and the Sumiyoshi Shrine. The city is also your gateway to Kyoto, Japan's ancient imperial capital and the nation's cultural and spiritual center.
  • Day 22 - Shimizu
  • Day 23 - Tokyo (Yokohama) Yokohama and Edo began life as sleepy fishing villages. That changed in the early 17th century after Tokugawa Ieyasu became Shogun. Edo became the center of political power in Japan, a position the city retained even after the restoration of Imperial rule in 1866. Contemporary Tokyo may be the most astonishing city on earth. It's a paradoxical mix of ancient tradition and postmodern culture. The Ginza - an international shopping mecca - stands near the serene grounds of the Imperial Palace, and the hyper-speed of 21st century consumerism is mysteriously reconciled with the elegance and serenity of traditional culture. Tokyo provides the traveler with a dizzying experience. With the Meiji Restoration of 1868, Edo was renamed Tokyo, the "Eastern Capital," to distinguish it from the old imperial capital at Kyoto, the "Western Capital."
  • Day 24 - At Sea
  • Day 25 - Hakodate It took Commodore Perry and American gunboat diplomacy to open Japan to the outside world after two centuries of self-imposed isolation. In 1859, the port of Hakodate became the first Japanese city fully opened to Westerners under the Treaty of Amity and Commerce. Foreigners soon flocked to Hakodate, and today visitors wandering the cobblestone streets of the city's Motomachi District can view their Western-style frame houses. Hakodate, once a fishing port famed for its high quality fish and shellfish, quickly became Hokkaido's largest city and one of Japan's most important ports. The Great Hakodate Fire of 1934 dealt the city a near fatal blow - a blow from which Hakodate was slow to recover. Today the city is Hokkaido's third largest - surpassed by Sapporo and Asahikawa - but retains its foremost position as the finest Japanese producer of sushi's raw product: the high quality seafood caught in Hokkaido's cold waters.
  • Day 26 - Kushiro Overlooking the mighty Pacific Ocean in northern Japan, it should come as no surprise that this "town of mist" is a major Japanese fishing port. But although the freshly caught seafood served ashore is a highlight for many visitors, Kushiro has so much more to offer! Stroll through Kushiro Fisherman's Wharf MOO, where a variety of coastal restaurants and boutiques delight tourists from all over. Or head inland to explore the natural wonders of this region, such as Kushiro Marsh, a lush national park and home to the country's most extensive marshland. Break out your binoculars for close-up views of the rare and graceful Japanese cranes at Tancho Nature Park. And if you're an architecture enthusiast, you'll be fascinated by the unusual structure of the Kushiro City Museum of Art, which resembles the shape of a Japanese crane spreading its wings.
  • Day 27 - At Sea
  • Day 28 - Cross International Dateline Cross International Dateline
  • Day 28 - At Sea
  • Day 29 - At Sea
  • Day 30 - At Sea
  • Day 31 - At Sea
  • Day 32 - Kodiak Known as Alaska's Emerald Isle, Kodiak explodes in lush greenery every summer. Its many islands feature rocky cliffs, marshlands and forests that play host to an abundance of wildlife, including the famous Kodiak brown bear. And Kodiak's sport fishing rivals that of any place in the world. It's also one of the largest commercial fishing ports in the nation.
  • Day 33 - Anchorage (Seward), Alaska
  • Day 34 - College Fjord Discovered in the northwest corner of Prince William Sound during an 1899 research expedition, spectacular College Fjord and its glaciers were named after prestigious east coast schools by the college professors who first laid eyes upon their majesty. Stretching for miles, these massive rivers of ice tumble down from mountains and through valleys, dipping into the pristine waters of the fjord. There you'll have a chance to watch the awe-inspiring process of glaciers calving, or dropping enormous pillars of ice into the sea, as they crack and land with a thunderous splash ? a once-in-a-lifetime experience not to be missed! College Fjord not only boasts the world's largest collection of tidewater glaciers, but it features magnificent snowcapped mountains as far as the eyes can see. Plus, during the summer, it's not unheard of to catch a glimpse of one of the area's 40-ton humpback whales feeding in the waters of the fjord.
  • Day 35 - Hubbard Glacier, Alaska The largest tidewater glacier in North America, Hubbard Glacier measures 76 miles long and plunges 1,200 feet into the depths of the bay. Its immense beauty and phenomenal blue hues are enchanting, even from afar. But it's when your cruise ship draws closer that its towering surface really impresses, dwarfing even the uppermost deck on your ship at a whopping 40 stories high. There, with the snowcapped mountains serving as a glorious backdrop, you'll have a prime viewing spot from which to witness the glacier calving, as it often expels icebergs the size of 10-story buildings-imagine the splash! The area around Hubbard Glacier is also renowned for its wildlife, where whales, harbor seals and otters swim, brown bears, moose and black-tailed deer roam ashore, and a wide variety of seabirds soar gracefully across the sky.
  • Day 36 - Sitka Take time to visit Sitka National Park, Alaska's oldest federally designated park. In the centre of Sitka lies St Michaels Cathedral which houses a collection of Russian Orthodox art and church treasures or take time to watch the New Archangel Dancers as they perform authentic Russian dances in costume.
  • Day 37 - Skagway Skagway was the gateway to the gold fields for the thousands who flocked to Alaska and the Yukon with the hope of striking it rich. Skagway may have boasted the shortest route to the Klondike, but it wasn't the easiest. Over 100 years ago, the White Pass route through the Coast Mountains and the shorter but steeper Chilkoot Trail were used by countless stampeders. Many a would-be miner perished on the treacherous Chilkoot Trail. The gold rush was a boon and by 1898, Skagway was Alaska's largest town with a population of about 20,000. Hotels, saloons, dance halls and gambling houses prospered. But when the gold yield dwindled in 1900, so did the population as miners quickly shifted to new finds in Nome. Today, Skagway has less than 1,000 residents. It still retains the flavor of the gold rush era.
  • Day 38 - Juneau In 1880, it was slow going for Joe Juneau and Richard Harris as they searched for gold with the help of Native guides. After climbing mountains, forging streams and facing countless difficulties, they found nuggets "as large as beans." From their discovery came three of the largest gold mines in the world. By the end of World War II, more than $150 million in gold had been mined. Eventually the mines closed, but the town Joe Juneau founded became the capital of Alaska and the business of gold was replaced by the business of government. Some 30,000 people live in Juneau. Its total area makes it one of the biggest towns, in size, in the world. Only Kiruna, Sweden, and Sitka, Alaska, exceed Juneau's 3,248 square miles. Today Juneau is famous not only for gold and government but also for its breathtakingly beautiful glaciers and stunning views of both water and mountains.
  • Day 39 - Ketchikan Ketchikan is known as Alaska's "First City" because it's the first major community travelers come to as they journey north. Located on an island, Ketchikan began life as an Indian fishing camp. The name Ketchikan comes from a Tlingit phrase that means "eagle with spread-out wings," a reference to a waterfall near town.
  • Day 40 - At Sea
  • Day 41 - Victoria, British Columbia, Canada
  • Day 42 - Vancouver It seems unlikely that a character named "Gassy Jack" Deighton would be responsible for one of the most beautiful cities on the continent. But that's history for you. During the gold rush, Gassy Jack saw a chance to make money from the hordes of miners on their way to the Yukon. The saloon he built became the focus of the shanty town known as Gastown. From that ragtag group of shacks, modern Vancouver was born. The provincial government persuaded settlers to change the name of the town to Vancouver, after Captain George Vancouver, who sailed the region's waters in 1792. Canada's third-largest city, Vancouver is a cosmopolitan place with a European feel and a personality all its own. It's a community with a rich ethnic mix - including the second-largest Chinatown in North America - and stunningly beautiful parks.
  • Day 43 - Vancouver It seems unlikely that a character named "Gassy Jack" Deighton would be responsible for one of the most beautiful cities on the continent. But that's history for you. During the gold rush, Gassy Jack saw a chance to make money from the hordes of miners on their way to the Yukon. The saloon he built became the focus of the shanty town known as Gastown. From that ragtag group of shacks, modern Vancouver was born. The provincial government persuaded settlers to change the name of the town to Vancouver, after Captain George Vancouver, who sailed the region's waters in 1792. Canada's third-largest city, Vancouver is a cosmopolitan place with a European feel and a personality all its own. It's a community with a rich ethnic mix - including the second-largest Chinatown in North America - and stunningly beautiful parks.
  • Day 44 - Seattle, Washington Seattle is a young city with a rich history. Settlers first landed at Alki Point in 1851 and named the area after Sealth, the Suquamish Indian chief who befriended them. Rebuilt after the Great Fire of 1889, "The Emerald City" has a legacy of vision and strength. Seattle has hosted two World's Fairs (1909 and 1962) and is the birthplace of two modern marvels, Boeing and Microsoft. Known for its rainy climate, Seattle actually averages less annual rainfall than many East Coast cities. The mild weather, spectacular natural surroundings and rich cultural diversity attract visitors from around the world.
  • Day 45 - At Sea
  • Day 46 - Astoria As the oldest American settlement west of the Rockies, Astoria offers a rich history for your exploration. It was first visited by Captain Robert Gray in 1792, by the Lewis & Clark Corps of Discovery in 1805, then adventuresome pioneers by the thousands. Now its your turn to experience the excitement of exploring Astoria. Within a 20 mile radius, one can see dozens of exciting attractions including Fort Stevens State Park, Fort Astoria, Heritage Center Museum, Flavel House Museum, Uppertown Fire Fighters Museum, Astoria Column and the Columbia River Maritime Museum, home to one of the nation's finest displays of model ships and nautical artifacts. Astoria offers other fun discoveries, such as historic Victorian homes and the beautiful 4.1 mile-long Astoria Bridge.
  • Day 47 - At Sea
  • Day 48 - San Francisco, California Cable cars, the Golden Gate rising from the fog - welcome to San Francisco, arguably the most romantic and cosmopolitan city in the United States. San Francisco has it all: a colorful history, superb restaurants, sophisticated museums, world-class shopping, and that elusive air of romance and abandon that's part of the tang of the city.
  • Day 49 - San Francisco, California Cable cars, the Golden Gate rising from the fog - welcome to San Francisco, arguably the most romantic and cosmopolitan city in the United States. San Francisco has it all: a colorful history, superb restaurants, sophisticated museums, world-class shopping, and that elusive air of romance and abandon that's part of the tang of the city.
** Itinerary may vary by sailing date.

Onboard experience

Sun Princess has always been a cruise ship industry pioneer. When she was christened, she set the bar for offering a high percentage of balcony staterooms from which to view the exotic destinations of the world. Sun Princess is has been recently updated to include our most popular onboard venues, including The Sanctuary®, a serene haven just for adults, and our inviting Movies Under the Stars®.

Facilities

Food and Drink: Sterling Steakhouse, Pizzeria, Atrium Bar, Ultimate Balcony Dining, Ice Cream Bar, 24-hour Buffet Bistro, Patisserie, Sabatini’s Italian restaurant, Regency Dining Room, Poolside Grill, Wheelhouse Bar, 24-hour Room Service, Trident Grill, Horizon Court, Wine & Caviar Bar, Wine bar
Recreational: Card Room, Outdoor Pool, Library, Sports Court, Shuffle Board, Paddle Tennis, Nightclub
Entertainment: Dance Club, Shooting Stars, Princess Theatre, Rendez-Vous, Show Lounges
Other: ScholarShip@Sea, Business Centre, Boutique, Wrap Around Promenade Deck, Duty-free shop, Future Cruise Sales
Fitness: Sports Court, Yoga, Ocean View Gymnasium, Volleyball, Basketball
Relaxation: Whirlpool, Spa, Lotus Spa

Deck layout

Aloha Deck
Baja Deck
Caribe deck
Dolphin Deck
Emerald Deck
Fiesta Deck
Lido Deck
Plaza Deck
Promenade Deck
Riviera Deck
Sun Deck

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